Dr. Jesse J. Hargrove's Comments

Comment Wall (563 comments)

At 9:18pm on April 16, 2009, Chinelo Bivens said…
Plot to kill president foiled, says Bolivia

BOLIVIA’S VICE-PRESIDENT claimed yesterday that security forces thwarted an assassination plot with the shooting dead of three suspected mercenaries, one of them an Irishman, in the city of Santa Cruz.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/world/2009/0417/1224244903825.html
At 1:32pm on April 20, 2009, Chasidy Taylor said…
According to www.guardian.co.uk., Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez presented President Obama with a book called " Open Veins of Latin America" by Eduardo Galeano when he visited Latin America.
At 1:33pm on April 20, 2009, Chasidy Taylor said…
President Obama visted the black countries of Trinidad and Tobago.
At 11:37am on May 21, 2009, Darian Payne said…
The Moors were people of african decent who were in western europe from 710 A.D. to about the 1400s A.D. The Moors were conquers who made a positive impact on the European cultural, socio-economic and political institutions. Traditionally, the Moors were the African people who occupied northwest Africa, or present-day Morocco and Mauritania. the word moors comes from the greek adjective mauros, which means dark or black. According to Wayne Chandler, who wrote the book “The Moor: Light of Europe’s Dark Age”, their roots can still b traced.
At 11:39am on May 21, 2009, Darian Payne said…
link found at http://www.essortment.com/all/whoweremoorsi_ogk.htm
At 6:01pm on May 22, 2009, Darian Payne said…
im doing my research paper on the dominican republic!!!!!
At 6:02pm on May 22, 2009, Cessily Martre said…
Hello Dr. Hargrove! My research paper is on Argentina.
At 5:33pm on May 23, 2009, Erin D Lett said…
My first choice for the research paper is Puerto Rico, if someone has that already I'll take Colombia.
At 6:16pm on May 23, 2009, Erin D Lett said…
The moors were people of Northern Africa, originally the inhabitants of Mauritania. They were of Berber and Arab descent. In the 8th century, the Moors were converted to Islam. Under Tariq ibn Ziyad they crossed to Gibraltar (711 A.D.) and overran the Spanish Visigoth kingdom of Roderick. They spread beyond the Pyrenees into France, where they were turned back at Tours by Charles Martel (732 A.D.).

In 776 A.D., Abd ar-Rahman established the Umayyad dynasty at Cordoba. The city became renowned as one of the greatest and wealthiest in Europe, famous as a centre of Muslim and Jewish culture. Moorish cities such as Toledo and Seville were famed for their new culture and universities. The centre of Jewish culture moved to Moorish Spain, and reached its zenith with Moses ben Maimon (1135-1204). Successive invasions of Moors brought thousands of skilled artisans, scholars, and farmers to Spain. They were killed or expelled in the Christian reconquest which began with the recovery of Toledo (1085), and during the height of the Inquisition were virtually exterminated. In 1502 all remaining professed Muslims were expelled from Spain by order of Queen Isabella. Moorish contribution to Western Europe is incalculable - in art and architecture, astronomy, music, medicine, science, and learning.

The Moors were the medieval Muslim inhabitants of al-Andalus (the Iberian Peninsula including present day Spain and Portugal) and the Maghreb and western Africa, whose culture is often called Moorish.

In 711, the Moors invaded Visigoth, Christian Hispania. Under their leader, an African Berber general named Tariq ibn-Ziyad, they brought most of the Iberian Peninsula under Islamic rule in an eight-year campaign. The Moors ruled in the Iberian peninsula, except for areas in the northwest (such as Asturias, where they were stopped at the battle of Covadonga) and the largely Basque regions in the Pyrenees, and in North Africa for several decades. Though the number of "Moors" remained small, they gained large numbers of converts. According to Ronald Segal, author of "Islam's Black Slaves", some 5.6 million of Iberia's 7 million inhabitants were Muslim by 1200, virtually all of them native inhabitants.

Reference: "Moors - History, Origins, Etymology, Human population genetics, Historical images, Other Moors in history, Present-day Moors" - http://encyclopedia.stateuniversity.com/pages/15392/Moors.html#ixzz0GNFGC5Pf&A
At 5:18pm on May 27, 2009, Tariq Cummings said…
According to Encyclopedia.com
Moors nomadic people of the northern shores of Africa, originally the inhabitants of Mauretania. They were chiefly of Berber and Arab stock. In the 8th cent. the Moors were converted to Islam and became fanatic Muslims. They spread SW into Africa (see Mauritania ) and NW into Spain. Under Tarik ibn Ziyad they crossed to Gibraltar in 711 and easily overran the crumbling Visigothic kingdom of Roderick . They spread beyond the Pyrenees into France, where they were turned back at Tours by Charles Martel (732). In 756, Abd ar-Rahman I established the Umayyad dynasty at Córdoba. This emirate became under Abd ar-Rahman III the caliphate of Córdoba. The court there grew in wealth, splendor, and culture. The regent al- Mansur in the late 10th cent. waged bitter warfare with the Christians of N Spain, where, from the beginning, the Moorish conquest had met with its only
...

Moors nomadic people of the northern shores of Africa, originally the inhabitants of Mauretania. They were chiefly of Berber and Arab stock. In the 8th cent. the Moors were converted to Islam and became fanatic Muslims. They spread SW into Africa (see Mauritania ) and NW into Spain. Under Tarik ibn Ziyad they crossed to Gibraltar in 711 and easily overran the crumbling Visigothic kingdom of Roderick . They spread beyond the Pyrenees into France, where they were turned back at Tours by Charles Martel (732). In 756, Abd ar-Rahman I established the Umayyad dynasty at Córdoba. This emirate became under Abd ar-Rahman III the caliphate of Córdoba. The court there grew in wealth, splendor, and culture. The regent al- Mansur in the late 10th cent. waged bitter warfare with the Christians of N Spain, where, from the beginning, the Moorish conquest had met with its only opposition. The cities of the south, Toledo, Córdoba, and Seville, speedily became centers of the new culture and were famed for their universities and architectural treasures (see Moorish art and architecture ). With the exception of brief periods, there was, however, no strong central government; the power was split up among dissenting local leaders and factions. The caliphate fell in 1031, and the Almoravids in 1086 took over Moorish Spain, which was throughout the whole period closely connected in rule with Morocco. Almoravid control slowly declined and by 1174 was supplanted by the Almohads . These successive waves of invasion had brought into Spain thousands of skilled Moorish artisans and industrious farmers who contributed largely to the intermittent prosperity of the country. They were killed or expelled in large numbers (to the great loss of Spain) in the Christian reconquest, which began with the recovery of Toledo (1085) by Alfonso VI , king of León and Castile. The great Christian victory (1212) of Navas de Tolosa prepared the way for the downfall of the Muslims. Córdoba fell to Ferdinand III of Castile in 1236. The wars went on, and one by one the Moorish strongholds fell, until only Granada remained in their hands. Málaga was taken (1487) after a long siege by the forces of Ferdinand and Isabella, and in 1492 Granada was recovered. Many of the Moors remained in Spain; those who remained faithful to Islam were called Mudejares, while those who accepted Christianity were called Moriscos . They were allowed to stay in Spain but were kept under close surveillance. They were persecuted by Philip II, revolted in 1568, and in the Inquisition were virtually exterminated. In 1609 the remaining Moriscos were expelled. Thus the glory of the Moorish civilization in Spain was gradually extinguished. Its contributions to Western Europe and especially to Spain were almost incalculable—in art and architecture, medicine and science, and learning (especially ancient Greek learning).
At 5:20pm on May 27, 2009, Tariq Cummings said…
i would like to do my research paper on The Country Panama.
At 5:20pm on May 27, 2009, Erin D Lett said…
The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages is the only national organization dedicated to the improvement and expansion of the teaching and learning of all languages at all levels of instruction. ACTFL is an individual membership organization of more than 9,000 foreign language educators and administrators from elementary through graduate education, as well as government and industry.

Since its founding, ACTFL has become synonymous with innovation, quality, and reliability in meeting the changing needs of foreign language educators and their students. From the development of Proficiency Guidelines, to its leadership role in the creation of national standards, ACTFL focuses on issues that are critical to the growth of both the profession and the individual teacher. Through their membership, new as well as veteran teachers are making an important investment in the future.

Reference: http://www.actfl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3274
At 5:22pm on May 27, 2009, Aaron Mosby said…
Nomadic people of the northern shores of Africa, originally the inhabitants of Mauretania. They were chiefly of Berber and Arab stock. In the 8th cent. The Moors were converted to Islam and became fanatic Muslims. They spread SW into Africa (see Mauritania) and NW into Spain. Under Tarik ibn Ziyad they crossed to Gibraltar in 711 and easily overran the crumbling Visigothic kingdom of Roderick. They spread beyond the Pyrenees into France, where they were turned back at Tours by Charles Martel (732). In 756, Abd ar-Rahman I established the Umayyad dynasty at Córdoba. This emirate became under Abd ar-Rahman III the caliphate of Córdoba. The court there grew in wealth, splendor, and culture. The regent al-Mansur in the late 10th cent. waged bitter warfare with the Christians of N Spain, where, from the beginning, the Moorish conquest had met with its only opposition. The cities of the south, Toledo, Córdoba, and Seville, speedily became centers of the new culture and were famed for their universities and architectural treasures (see Moorish art and architecture). With the exception of brief periods, there was, however, no strong central government; the power was split up among dissenting local leaders and factions. The caliphate fell in 1031, and the Almoravids in 1086 took over Moorish Spain, which was throughout the whole period closely connected in rule with Morocco. Almoravid control slowly declined and by 1174 was supplanted by the Almohads. These successive waves of invasion had brought into Spain thousands of skilled Moorish artisans and industrious farmers who contributed largely to the intermittent prosperity of the country. They were killed or expelled in large numbers (to the great loss of Spain) in the Christian reconquest, which began with the recovery of Toledo (1085) by Alfonso VI, king of León and Castile. The great Christian victory (1212) of Navas de Tolosa prepared the way for the downfall of the Muslims. Córdoba fell to Ferdinand III of Castile in 1236. The wars went on, and one by one the Moorish strongholds fell, until only Granada remained in their hands. Málaga was taken (1487) after a long siege by the forces of Ferdinand and Isabella, and in 1492 Granada was recovered. Many of the Moors remained in Spain; those who remained faithful to Islam were called Mudejares, while those who accepted Christianity were called Moriscos. They were allowed to stay in Spain but were kept under close surveillance. They were persecuted by Philip II, revolted in 1568, and in the Inquisition were virtually exterminated. In 1609 the remaining Moriscos were expelled. Thus the glory of the Moorish civilization in Spain was gradually extinguished. Its contributions to Western Europe and especially to Spain were almost incalculable–in art and architecture, medicine and science, and learning (especially ancient Greek learning).
At 5:26pm on May 27, 2009, Erin D Lett said…
The five C's of Foreign Language Learning are: Communicate, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, Communities
At 5:44pm on May 27, 2009, Darian Payne said…
the 5 C's are communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities
At 5:46pm on May 27, 2009, Aaron Mosby said…
The country i chose to research, Brazil.
At 5:46pm on May 27, 2009, Tariq Cummings said…
Pop clock presents world births, deaths, and natural increase for the current year expressed per year, month, day, hour, minute, and second, according to the Us Census Bureau.
At 5:48pm on May 27, 2009, Darian Payne said…
The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) is the only national organization dedicated to the improvement and expansion of the teaching and learning of all languages at all levels of instruction. ACTFL is an individual membership organization of more than 9,000 foreign language educators and administrators from elementary through graduate education, as well as government and industry.

Since its founding, ACTFL has become synonymous with innovation, quality, and reliability in meeting the changing needs of foreign language educators and their students. From the development of Proficiency Guidelines, to its leadership role in the creation of national standards, ACTFL focuses on issues that are critical to the growth of both the profession and the individual teacher. Through their membership, new as well as veteran teachers are making an important investment in the future

From http://www.actfl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3274
At 5:52pm on May 27, 2009, Tariq Cummings said…
COMMUNICATION
Communicate in Languages Other Than English

Standard 1.1: Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions
Standard 1.2: Students understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics
Standard 1.3: Students present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.
CULTURES
Gain Knowledge and Understanding of Other Cultures

Standard 2.1: Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the culture studied
Standard 2.2: Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and perspectives of the culture studied
CONNECTIONS
Connect with Other Disciplines and Acquire Information

Standard 3.1: Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the foreign language
Standard 3.2: Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures
COMPARISONS
Develop Insight into the Nature of Language and Culture

Standard 4.1: Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own
Standard 4.2: Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own.
COMMUNITIES
Participate in Multilingual Communities at Home & Around the World

Standard 5.1: Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting
Standard 5.2: Students show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.
At 5:53pm on May 27, 2009, Erin D Lett said…
STANDARDS FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEARNING

1) COMMUNICATION
Communicate in Languages Other Than English

Standard 1.1: Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions
Standard 1.2: Students understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics
Standard 1.3: Students present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

2) CULTURES
Gain Knowledge and Understanding of Other Cultures

Standard 2.1: Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the practices and perspectives of the culture studied
Standard 2.2: Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and perspectives of the culture studied

3) CONNECTIONS
Connect with Other Disciplines and Acquire Information

Standard 3.1: Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the foreign language
Standard 3.2: Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures

4) COMPARISONS
Develop Insight into the Nature of Language and Culture

Standard 4.1: Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own
Standard 4.2: Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own.

5) COMMUNITIES
Participate in Multilingual Communities at Home & Around the World

Standard 5.1: Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting
Standard 5.2: Students show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.

Reference: http://www.actfl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3652

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